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The Margin: No solar eclipse? Twitter finds the bright spot

A rare total solar eclipse delivered amazing views to many in Europe Friday morning — but what lit up Twitter were jokes from those who missed out due to weather conditions.

Even before the eclipse, which got going at about 8:30 a.m. in the U.K., the humorous posts got going:

Reality of the eclipse: pic.twitter.com/vJxO4OHeoJ

— David Lewis (@David_C_Lewis) March 20, 2015

Stay safe, Great Britain. pic.twitter.com/47NPWazTsR

— Laura Kemp (@Laurajanekemp) March 20, 2015

In the build-up to the celestial event people were warned — repeatedly — not to look directly at the sun, but to use special glasses, or, failing that, to make pinholes in cardboard and watch a projection. (Though this guy watching in the Arctic ran into another danger — a polar bear.) Those living the far north of Europe were told they’d see a total eclipse of the Sun, while others further south and in north Africa would only get a partial cover-up.

Some saw the eclipse in its full glory:

The solar smile in Cheshire. Magnificent! #eclipse2015 #CheshireCat pic.twitter.com/NqlQ9MpqrV

— Annie Irving (@sconzani) March 20, 2015

It wasn’t cloudy everywhere for #eclipse2015. This was the spectacular view in Svalbard http://t.co/94XEPrTQWW pic.twitter.com/uM7c4yQJcF

— Sky News (@SkyNews) March 20, 2015

Eclipse seen from the STV News studios in Aberdeen. How’s the view where you are? http://t.co/xycAnsRq9S pic.twitter.com/aqjMoySLKX

— STV News (@STVNews) March 20, 2015

In parts of the U.K., though, clouds and an unusually high level of smog meant many were disappointed when the peak eclipse time rolled round at around 9:30 a.m. Instead of a dramatic blotting-out of the Sun, all watchers in London got was a drop in temperature and an unbroken view of gloomier-than-normal gray sky. Cue the Twitticisms:

You don’t see this every day pic.twitter.com/e5hDLwrn4l

— Jo Unwin (@jounwin) March 20, 2015

Sitting in Turkish café on a cloudy London morn as BBC talks excitedly about eclipse. “It looks like every day,” owner says of grey skies.

— Mark MacKinnon (@markmackinnon) March 20, 2015

The view of the #solareclipse from my house is amazing. pic.twitter.com/enff2SOA6b

— Drew J. Stearne (@drewstearne) March 20, 2015

Everyone has just gone outside at work to experience the gloom. I’ve never seen anything quite so British.

— Sir Gremlin (@Sir_Gremlin) March 20, 2015

Americans won’t get a glimpse of this eclipse, but there is one due in the U.S. on Aug. 21, 2017. Sadly, this was the last chance in a lifetime for those disappointed Europeans, as the next won’t occur in that region until September, 2090.

Of course, they could travel to other parts of the world — about 20 total and annual eclipses are expected over the next 10 years. Or, if space tourism really takes off, they could go even further afield to get the best view not on Earth.

This is what the solar eclipse looked like from space http://t.co/mhW8rU6l9I pic.twitter.com/4I2LcxXGFX

— Mashable (@mashable) March 20, 2015

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The Margin: No solar eclipse? Twitter finds the bright spot Reviewed by on . A rare total solar eclipse delivered amazing views to many in Europe Friday morning — but what lit up Twitter were jokes from those who missed out due to weathe A rare total solar eclipse delivered amazing views to many in Europe Friday morning — but what lit up Twitter were jokes from those who missed out due to weathe Rating:
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